Last week in Japan

A week from today, I will leave Tokyo and travel to Gaborone. I don’t exactly know what to say or how to express my feelings (I’m not sure I know what I’m feeling), but I did want to post and share some photos from Fukuoka. I visited Fukuoka between project meetings in Osaka and Nagoya, and Fukuoka is the city from which I visited Hiroshima and Miyajima as well.

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At the ruins of Fukuoka Castle in Maizuru Park.
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Lantern at the Sumiyoshi-jinja Shinto shrine, just across the street from my Airbnb.
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A surprisingly beachy area at the outskirts of Fukuoka.

Fukuoka is a friendly town and quite small compared to the other Japanese cities I’ve seen. It’s easy to explore most of the city center in one day on foot, which was a refreshing change from the immensity of Tokyo, where even after many weeks here there’s still so much to see. I’ve spent the majority of my time in Japan in Tokyo, but as I’ve described before, my time in the capital city has been spent with host families and really trying to blend in with daily life. As I’ve avoided trying to be a tourist, I almost feel like I’ve seen less here than in the other cities. But I think it’s simply that Tokyo is more of a mega-city-complex than one city, and seeing everything (including the many possible day trips from Tokyo) was never going to happen over the span of a couple months, not with project meetings and language classes and host families thrown in the mix. I’d still choose the project and host families, though – this “Watson style” travel – over seeing all of Tokyo in one go!

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Fukuoka had beautiful flowers all over the city – lovely city planning.
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It’s also a canal city with many bridges.
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Looking at this building, I didn’t feel like I was in Japan anymore.

It’s still hard feeling as though I’m leaving things unfinished, and I wonder if I could have made more of my first month here. That’s the Watson, though – you have to pack up and go, whether you’re ready or not. I’ve been quite ready to leave every country I’ve traveled to so far this year; I’m not sure I’m ready to leave Japan. Of course, I hope to come back, and I am beginning to get excited and curious about Botswana – a good sign that it is, in fact, time to move on.

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Fukuoka’s ACROS building.
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Sunset over Fukuoka’s river. Far off on the right are yatai, the canal-facing food stalls for which Fukuoka is famous.
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Each yatai has a simple Japanese menu and about 10 seats. The idea is that people will come here to eat and drink and mingle with the other diners. After waiting a while for a seat, I joined a stall full of Japanese customers and had a hilarious Japanese/English conversation with my nearby diners.

Thinking about the project meetings I’ve had here, I’m fairly happy with the range (professors, doctors, people at start-ups, and people at larger corporations), but I still had a much wider range in India over the same time span (all of the former, along with ashram gurus, visits to hospitals, NGO workers, and more). I’ve wondered many times this year about order bias – how the order in which I’m visiting these countries is impacting my experience in them. I think my expectations get more defined (and thus more critical) as time goes on. As the year progresses, the end of each country visit fills in another detailed segment of the once-blank canvas of “What could this year look like?”. It’ll be a strange feeling at the end of Botswana when that painting is well and truly done – when I no longer have any questions about a year that once loomed before me in its uncertainty.

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A short train ride from Fukuoka is Dazaifu, a city of mountains and temples that’s perfect for a day visit over the weekend.
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At Dazaifu’s main shrine.
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I had never seen a tree supported by wooden slats before.

Also, I think it’s been a bit challenging to “break in” in terms of my meetings in Japan because of the language difference, which has been more difficult here than anywhere else. There are also simply fewer medical technology start-ups than I expected due to the ever-strong corporate culture. Maybe there’s something else, too, something I can’t quite put my finger on – but there’s some distance I haven’t always been able to break through when trying to schedule meetings and so on. I often get the sense here that Japan has such a unique culture and has so much figured out that it doesn’t need the rest of the world.

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A quiet area in Dazaifu.
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I managed to find my way to the top of one of Dazaifu’s nearby mountains.
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Overlooking Dazaifu city.

Of course, my time here has also been complicated by the fact that I’ve wanted to come to Japan for so many years – I was always going to have high expectations for my time here, as well as feel slightly pulled between wanting to see as much as I could, making the most of my time here, and figuring how best to approach my project. I suppose no span of time, then, would ever be enough!

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I loved the late-blooming pink-and-green sakura trees here (Dazaifu).
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Dazaifu had a lot of beautiful nature.

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On the way to RoboSquare, far from central Fukuoka.

While I was in Fukuoka, I made a point to visit the “RoboSquare,” a center showcasing various Japanese-made robots. I wanted to go because I had read that they had a Paro, a Japanese care robot made to look like a fluffy seal who has helped dementia patients worldwide. I contacted the government organization that made Paro a reality and was never able to get an interview, so I wanted to see it in person. (The agency is AIST: Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

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Paro was “sleeping” when I first saw it, but after I petted its head (as the RoboSquare attendant instructed), it slowly lifted its head up and to the side, blinking its big eyes and making cute noises.

RoboSquare was a small room in a shopping complex, but it was still exciting to “meet” a robot I had read about months earlier. As far as robots go, it’s nice that Paro is soft and fluffy all over (though the big black eyes looked a bit creepy to me). There was an information card next to Paro that explained how the robot has been used in pediatric wards, nursing homes, and hospitals. AIST conducted studies that proved that both children and elderly patients had improved mental states and lower stress levels after interacting with Paro. The Paro robot has been around for over ten years now, so hopefully AIST can continue to sponsor more health technology projects in Japan.

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I also met this robot, which has nothing to do with healthcare but still caught my attention. This is the Japanese-made SR-01, a search-and-rescue robot that helped find missing people on 9/11 in NYC, over fifteen years ago.
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For some reason this was at the RoboSquare as well – a software platform that dresses you up in the outfit of your choice! I love space stuff, so I decided to be an astronaut.
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Last shot from the Fukuoka beach area. My guess is that this is a fancy resort, but I’m not sure.
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