Botswana: First impressions

The Batswana – the people of Botswana – refer to the country as “Bots,” and I love that. Gaborone is pronounced Ha-borone-y, but this city has a nickname too: Gabs. I’ve already been here for ten days, and I can’t believe it. Time flies by faster as the Watson goes on, I’m sure.

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I flew from Tokyo to Doha (back to Qatar!), then from Doha to Johannesburg, and finally from Johannesburg to Gaborone on this little plane.

Botswana is a huge change from Japan. The population here is about 2 million people; 10% of them, 200,000, live in Gabs. Japan has 127 million people with 13 million living in Tokyo alone. I knew that Gabs wouldn’t be nearly as urban or pedestrian-friendly as Tokyo, nor as safe. I even read a mildly alarming email from the US Government suggesting that visitors avoid walking around solo at all.

Luckily that email was over-cautionary (though I still won’t be walking around in the nighttime), and after a couple days in Botswana, I started to feel at home. The transition from Japan was quicker and easier than I expected. I don’t know if that’s because I’m used to transitions now, and better at adapting quickly to new and foreign places, or because the people here are so friendly and easy to talk to in English – probably both!

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Botswana is quite sparsely populated.

The surrealism of the Watson is often lost on me these days, though I frequently marveled at the lovely strangeness of it all in my first few months. It’s become an odd routine – of traveling, landing someplace new, figuring out how to get a local number, taking a couple days to figure things out and feel safe – that I’ve learned to repeat in each new country or even city. Each new destination gets easier to manage, and each unexpected interaction or step along the way seems less like a snag. That in itself is exciting and surreal, though, knowing that I now feel comfortable walking into pretty much any situation and making it feel like home.

Of course, this is the end of the proverbial road, and I won’t be traveling to another new country after Botswana. But that’s not to say the U.S. will feel exactly like the place I left, and maybe this new-country-routine is something I can apply, on a much smaller scale, to my return back home and whatever “reverse culture shock” awaits me there.

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Cracking up in this teacup at an empty amusement park here called “Lion Park.”

Speaking of home, I just extended my stay at an Airbnb here by an additional 7 weeks – the remainder of my time in Botswana. Though I might travel out of Gaborone over the next couple months (in fact, I just did yesterday), it’s always nice to have a home base. I can leave for a night or a few and come back while leaving some of my stuff in a place that I know is safe.

Anyway, this is a big milestone for me because it means that I’ve figured out a place to stay for every single night of the Watson year. Just before I left for Sweden, I only had a few weeks of housing figured out, and it scared me. I had to set up all my own accommodation for 365 distinct nights, and I didn’t know where I was going to be – and at the same time, my friends were moving into apartments with yearlong leases. I knew that I would be okay figuring things out day-to-day on the Watson year once I got over the hurdle of where to stay night-to-night. Now that I’ve booked these last 7 weeks, that’s it. I’ve done it – I found a safe place to stay every night of the Watson and stayed in budget while doing so. I’m tempted to say that it was easier than I expected, but maybe that’s just in hindsight.

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The Central Business District of Gaborone. It’s really mostly buildings under construction.

Finally, the stars here are just beautiful – Gaborone must have the least light pollution of any city or town I’ve been in this year. (If I could capture them on my camera, I would certainly post a photo). I keep getting distracted by them at night. I don’t think most of the Batswana notice.

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