To the village

IMG_8961.jpg
There’s not much to do in Sekhutlane, but we had some fun at this bakery.

Last week, I had the opportunity to visit the remote village of Sekhutlane (pronounced something like ‘Sek-qui-kla-nay’), a 5 hour’s drive from Gaborone. I was there with some members of BUP, the University of Botswana – UPenn Partnership, to meet government healthcare workers who had participated in a mobile health program to perform vision screenings on schoolchildren using a smartphone app (called “Peek Acuity;” more on that in another post).

IMG_8935.jpg
On the way to Sekhutlane.
IMG_8949.jpg
A welcome sight after waking up at 5:00am in Gaborone!

Sekhutlane is a village of about 700 people, and most people seem to farm or work in government-sponsored volunteering positions that provide food and water. There are hardly any shops, and the closest upper high school is in the next village, 70km away. Since the main mode of transport in Sekhutlane is a donkey-drawn cart, 70km is a prohibitive distance for most.

IMG_8958.jpg
Sekhutlane.
IMG_8952
This  is the car we took to get to the village. Four-wheel drive is a must; our last hour on the way to the village was along a bumpy dirt road.
IMG_8989
It’s pretty common to hire drivers for these sorts of trips and pay them in cash for their driving and the gas.
IMG_8955
The only shop in the village is a small shack of corrugated steel where you can buy basic items over the counter.

We hadn’t brought any lunch, and the only place to get ready-made food in the village is a small bakery that makes simple rolls and loaves in an outdoor oven. The bread was warm, soft, and delicious after such a long car ride. We learned from the healthcare workers, Kenewe and Kagiso, that the villagers eat canned food most of the time, especially canned beef and fish. Kenewe and Kagiso are not from Sekhutlane originally – the government assigned them there to work for two years. They are both far from home and hope to get reassigned to a less remote location in the future.

IMG_8963
One of the BUP team members enjoys a freshly-baked roll in front of the bakery’s oven.
IMG_8974
Kenewe (left) and Kagiso (right). They were so lovely to talk to.

Though we were there to learn more about a mobile health endeavor, the challenges in Sekhutlane rarely involve technology. There are vision problems in the village, often due to the dust, but the more pressing issues are HIV/AIDS management and teenage pregnancy. Kagiso said that, since junior high is the highest level of school in the village, many of them finish school at 15 and become parents. They don’t know what else to do, he said, especially since they aren’t exposed to a range of possible professions they might aspire to. Kagiso is also frustrated with the way the government “spoon-feeds” the villagers, providing them food and even housing for minimal work – he wishes the government would instead incentivize them to become self-sustainable in some way.

IMG_8969
A home in Sekhutlane.

The president of Botswana is experiencing a bit of backlash right now for a recent visit to Sweden, where he discussed Botswana’s military policy and its “need” for an air force. A few people I’ve met, including the healthcare workers in Sekhutlane, are frustrated that the president is talking about war in such a peaceful country. Instead, they say, he could be focused on bringing health and education to all areas of the country.

IMG_8951
A man on his way out of Sekhutlane.

We arrived on Sekhutlane’s “ARV Day” – the healthcare workers devote one day each week to providing the villagers with the newest stock of antiretroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS treatment – so the clinic was quite busy. Kagiso and Kenewe told us that HIV is so common, and the village so small, that they can usually figure out which villager is responsible for a new case. They said that since HIV/AIDS is so out in the open in Sekhutlane, there’s very little stigma about it there, and people feel comfortable talking about their partners and the disease.

IMG_8984
The clinic of Sekhutlane. Check out the spots on that goat!

When I was in Lobatse, someone said that a main contributing factor to the high rate of HIV/AIDS in Botswana is an attitude here of “I am my own boss.” I suppose it’s the flip-side – the lack of a common collective attitude – that is the real culprit, a mindset that doesn’t encourage thinking about how your actions affect others. Kagiso and Kenewe also happened to mention this individualism with regards to other issues in the village. Kenewe talked about a time she once tried to help a young child at school by providing him with new clothes. The other parents became jealous and angry with Kenewe, and they stole the clothes off of the child to put on their own children. She gave up after that.

IMG_8971
Sekhutlane.

Another example of this thinking came up in our discussion about the vision screening, the initial reason we went to Sekhutlane. As a result of the screening, two children were diagnosed with vision problems, and their parents needed to bring them to a specific site on a specific day to receive glasses. Only one family had the means to do this, so only one of the two children actually got their glasses. “Why couldn’t that family take the other child, too?” I asked. “You only take care of your own here,” said Kenewe. That’s the attitude: fierce independence, even to the disadvantage of other community members. I’m not sure what caused this “I am my own boss” culture, but it’s been fascinating to hear it come up in so many discussions about health here.

Overall, it was great to see Sekhutlane and understand rural Botswana as a contrast to Gaborone.

IMG_8985.jpg
A donkey cart in Sekhutlane.
IMG_8995.jpg
The most water and green I’ve seen since arriving in Botswana! Apparently this is South Africa, though, on the other side of the river.
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “To the village

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s