Victoria Falls

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Pretty amazing. With the “rain” coming from the rushing water misting up over us, plus the sun in the sky, we kept seeing rainbows all over the falls.
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On a tiny plane from Gaborone to Kasane.

Okay, I did it. I went to Victoria Falls. It was a pretty touristy weekend, but so worth it – the falls are beautiful. I went with 3 other women, and we did it all in 48 hours: flew to Kasane, the north-easternmost town in Botswana where we stayed for 2 nights; saw animals in the national park from the water; day-tripped to the Zimbabwean side of Victoria Falls; and flew back home to Gaborone the next day. I think it was the best way to do the trip, at least from the Botswana side. If I ever go again, I’ll definitely want to see the Zambia side of the falls (Vic Falls is a bit like Niagara in that it can be viewed from one of two countries).

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My first time seeing a hippo in the wild! And that’s the Botswana flag in the background.
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Elephants on the water. Chobe must be the greenest area in Botswana.

Kasane is essentially a tourist town, a name for where all the lodges line up along the Chobe River. The Chobe National Park, known for its wildlife, is one of the main tourist destinations in Botswana – Gaborone certainly isn’t (very few travelers hang around Gabs, as I have, but of course I’m not really a tourist). It’s very close to the borders of Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Zambia.

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Sunset on the Chobe River.

To get to the falls on Saturday morning, we took a van organized by the lodge with other travelers. First, we passed through the Botswana border patrol and got departure stamps in our passports. Next, we arrived at the Zimbabwe border patrol, where we had to get full-page visas to enter the country for the day (it’s actually really cool-looking!). This was quite the experience. We were told to leave our passports at the counter in this tiny office and walk away from them – never a good feeling – and leave our driver/guide to pick them up and bring them back to the van. After 20 minutes or so, we got them back…all except one. One German girl from our van didn’t get her passport back right away. Somehow it had ended up with a Korean man in a van ahead of us, and it took a long time to sort that out! A lot of tourists were coming through that border post.

My group was curious about the Zambia side of the falls. We saw a poster for a one-day Zambia-Zimbabwe visa and asked our guide about it. “Can we go to Zambia today too? We heard the falls are beautiful from that side.” “No, just Zimbabwe.” “But look at this poster!” “Well, we don’t bring people to Zambia.” “Why not?” “There won’t be time.” (It was clear by this point that our guide had a plan he wanted to stick to, and we should not try to deviate from that plan. I would have loved to do the day trip without a guide if possible, but this was the way to do it). “But we have all day – can’t we just pop over there?” “Uh…they won’t let you.” “Why not?” “You can’t re-enter Zimbabwe from the Zambia side if you don’t have proof that you’ve gotten the yellow fever vaccine.” Well, from my travels in South Africa, I did have the yellow fever vaccine, and I even had my yellow card with me to prove it because I keep it with my passport. So of course I took it out. “Well, I actually have that right here!” He gave me a look that clearly said “No.” I eventually walked out to the van and waited for my passport.

As it turned out, we did go into Zambia, but only for a few minutes and very unofficially (no passport stamp). When you get to the falls in Zimbabwe, there are two parts: the main part where you enter the Vic Falls park and walk along the falls on the Zimbabwe side, seeing them from many different viewpoints, and then a short distance away, a big bridge for the activities (bungee jumping, zip-lining, and so on). The bridge is beautiful, and it actually does go from Zimbabwe to Zambia, though for the activities you only spend a few minutes on that side. Two of the girls I was with wanted to go bungee jumping, so we went to the bridge first before officially seeing the falls. We heard the falls in the background and saw part of them from a distance, which built up our anticipation of the falls.

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The bridge from the Zimbabwe side. Someone is bungee jumping off it in this photo!

Bungee jumping looked a bit too scary for me, as well as way out of my budget, but I did go zip-lining with the other person in my group! It was probably the most extravagant thing I’ve done on the Watson so far, but it was a blast. And now I can say that I zip-lined from Zambia to Zimbabwe – so that seems pretty worth it.

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“Beware – Hazardous Drop Ahead.” You can’t tell from the photo, but we’re both freaking out at this moment!
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I realize this photo is super corny but I was having a blast. The view was beautiful.

Finally, after our short stint in Zambia, all our activities, and lunch, we went to the Victoria Falls UNESCO World Heritage Site in Zimbabwe. We entered the gate and saw two paths, one to the right and one to the left. Someone told us that they started from the left but that both paths lead to the falls. We took the right.

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We followed the tree-lined path for a while and eventually stumbled upon the falls, mysteriously shrouded in white mist. It was cold and damp, and the mist rose forcefully up from the falls and rained back down right on top of us. It was a sunny day, so we saw a lot of rainbows. As we moved further along the path, we got closer to the falls – and we got soaked! The water was rushing quickly and loudly and caused enough rain to drench us in minutes. It’s a wonder we were still able to take photos with our cameras and phones without damaging them.

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One of the Victoria Falls viewpoints on the mistier side: Horseshoe Falls, not too far from Rainbow Falls (the fog was too heavy for me to get a picture of that sign!).

At one point the fog lifted a bit, and we began to grasp the immensity of the falls. We couldn’t even see the bottom of the gorge where the water was falling. As the only four people standing at the edge of the falls, we were cold and dripping and giddy with excitement.

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Completely drenched at Rainbow Falls!
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Beginning to see more of the falls…

We then doubled back on the path to go towards the other end of the falls. At each viewpoint, the falls looked more and more beautiful. We realized we went through the whole thing backwards – if we had taken that left at the start, we would have begun with the traditional (and dry) view of the falls, and then ended at the misty Rainbow Falls viewpoint, where we started. But I’m so happy we did it in reverse. We got to see the mystery of Victoria Falls slowly unfold in front of us, beginning with our first glimpse from far away on the Zimbabwe-Zambia bridge. We got to discover Vic Falls bit by bit throughout the day until the full beauty of it was finally in front of us. If we had started with the classic, full view, we wouldn’t have had that slow, exciting build-up – and we wouldn’t have been so happy about getting soaked by the falls at the end when we couldn’t even really see them.

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The largest falls in the world in terms of water flow!

All in all, it was a really great trip, and I’m so happy I got to go. I want to see the rest of the natural world wonders now! I was also really content to return “home” to Gaborone. I was talking about the definition of “home” with my friends after we got back. How long do you have to stay somewhere before you can say that you lived there? What does it mean to have a home? One idea was that you live somewhere if you would give a friend that address so that they can write you a letter. Another idea was that when you buy groceries and cook for yourself in a place, you’re living there. The amount of time you spend somewhere definitely matters, but so does your relationship to that space.

I realized that my idea of home is a place that I leave and come back to. The weirdest aspect of traveling on the Watson is the way that it’s sustained; you hop from one strange place to another without ever going back to your true “home.” Most people travel in distinct trips, from home and then back. When I went from Stockholm to Doha and then onto Mumbai, I didn’t feel like I lived in Stockholm. I never called Doha “home.” But then I used Mumbai as a base while in India – I traveled out to other cities and states in the country but usually returned to Mumbai in between. By the end of my time in India, Mumbai felt like home. I could leave stuff there and return to it, just like a regular trip-taker; I created the illusion for myself that I wasn’t living the sustained nomadic lifestyle of the Watson, where you take everything with you every time you move. I’m not sure if any of that makes sense. But the point is that, on Sunday when I was flying back into Gaborone from Kasane, I felt like I was coming home.

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Probably my favorite view of the falls, right at the end.
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